King at the Controls The King Jammy’s Story [Documentary] (2006)

king jammys

king jammys

Lloyd ‘King Jammy’ James is one of central pillars in the creation of modern Dancehall as we know it today, and he also created and produced some of the most influential and enduring rhythms that are still get re-mixed and reused today.

Jammy started his a career as an apprentice under King Tubby and soon graduated as a formidable producer in his own right. By the latter half of the 1970s Jammy was releasing his own productions and had a number of high profile artists under his guidance, including Black Uhuru, Johnny Osbourne and many more.

Jammy practically single-handedly invented the digital dancehall genre when he launched ‘Under Mi Sleng Teng’ to unsuspecting Jamaican dancehall patrons, and eventually the world.

This documentary, made in 2006, charts the story of King Jammy with access to the man himself, as well as interviews with a wealth of artists from the 70s to the present day – including Wayne Smith, Elephant Man, Chaka Demus, Josey Wales, Ninjaman, Little Twitch, Bobby Digital, and many more.

This hour long film charts Jammy’s rise and covers his impact on reggae music, his productions, his studio, and also takes an extended look at the impact of his sound system and some of the most notable clashes he had.

Check it out below:

KING AT THE CONTROLS – THE KING JAMMY’S STORY (2006)

Bullwackie In New York 1981 (Wackies Rhythm Force) [Documentary]

wackies reggae

wackies reggae

If you doidn’t know already, Wackies is a highly influential reggae label that ran out of New York and was at the height of its powers in the late 70s and through the 80s, working with US and Jamaican artists alike, including Leroy Sibbles, Horace Andy, Love Joys, Jah Batta, Sugar Minott and many many more. Wackies went on to have a studio, label, and record shop all under the Wackies brand.

It was established and run by Lloyd ‘Bullwackie’ Barnes, and Barnes is still involved in re-issues from the Wackies catalogue, as well as working on the odd new release with collaborators.

The Wackies sound was distinctive, and had a focus on deep bass heavy rhythms, with cutting edge technology often used to layer on sound effects and create the signature Wackies style.

This documentary called ‘Bullwackie In New York’ was directed by Christopher Coy and is a fascinating hour long look at the Wackies family and how they became the most recognizable and influential reggae label in the USA during the 1980s.

It is full of great interviews, live shows, and studio footage, creating a great snaphot of the New York reggae scene.